classification

Fracture of pelvis - Tile classification (original)

The original Tile classification divides pelvic fractures into three basic types according to stability based on the integrity of the posterior sacroiliac complex. It also takes into consideration the force involved. In type A, the fracture does not involve the posterior arch. Type B fracture is a result of rotational forces that cause partial disruption of the posterior sacroiliac complex. Complete disruption of the posterior complex (including the sacrospinous and sacrotuberous ligaments) occurs in type C fractures, that are both rotationally and vertically unstable.

Fracture of pelvis - AO classification - modifed Tile AO Müller classification

The modified Tile AO Müller classification, like the original, divides pelvic fractures into three basic types according to stability based on the integrity of the posterior sacroiliac complex. It takes into consideration the direction of the force involved. In type A, the fracture does not involve the posterior arch. Type B fracture is a result of rotational forces that cause partial disruption of the posterior sacroiliac complex.

Scaphoid fracture - Mayo classification

Mayo classification divides scaphoid fractures into three basic types according to anatomic location of the fracture line. Fracture of the distal third of scaphoid bone are further divided according to involvement of the distal articular surface or the distal tubercle.

Type Description
proximal fracture of the proximal third of the scaphoid bone
middle fracture of the middle third of the scaphoid bone

Scaphoid fracture - Herbert classification

Herbert classification of scaphoid fractures is primarily based on the distinction between stable fractures, which can be treated non-operatively, and unstable fractures in the acute setting.

Type Description
A: acute, stable A1: fracture of the tubercle
A2: nondisplaced incomplete fracture in the waist
B: acute, unstable B1: oblique fracture in the distal third

Fracture of olecranon - Colton classification

Colton classification was the first classification of olecranon fractures. It divides them according to displacement of fragments into two types. Displaced fractures are further divided into four subtypes.

Type Description
Undisplaced and stable displacement <2mm, displacement does not increase with elbow flexion
Displaced A) avulsion fracture
B) oblique or transverse fracture

Fracture of olecranon - Mayo classification

Mayo classification divides fractures of olecranon according to stability, displacement, and comminution. Each of the three basic types is divided into two subtypes according to the presence of comminution.

Type Description
Type I undisplaced
A) non-comminuted
B) comminuted
Type II displaced >3mm, stable
A) non-comminuted
B) comminuted
Type III

Le Fort classification of fractures of facial skeleton

Le Fort classification divides fractures of the midface skeleton into three basic types according to the location of the fracture plane. However, most fractures are too complex to fit exactly one of the types.

Type Synonym Description
Le Fort I Guérin fracture, floating palate Horizontal fracture though the maxilla and both maxillary sinuses separates the alveolar ridge of maxilla.
Le Fort II

Fracture of shoulder blade, Zdravkovic - Damholt classification of scapular fractures

Zdravkovic classification divides scapular fractures into three types according to their anatomical location.

Type Description
Type I fracture of the body of scapula
Type II fracture of the apophysis including the coracoid and acromion
Type III fracture of the supero-lateral angle including the neck and glenoid

References:

Idiopathic Lung fibrosis - semiquantitative grading of fibrotic and ground glass score

Gay et al. used a semiquantitative score to objectively assess the extent of lung fibrosis. In the study, each lobe was scored separately and mean of all lobes was used as a fibrotic, ground glass, and total score for each patient.

Alveolar score Description
0 no alveolar disease
1 ground glass opacity involving <5% of the lobe (minimal disease)
2 ground glass opacity involving <25% of the lobe

Lung fibrosis - semiquantitative grading by Warrick et al.

Warrick classification of lung involvement in interstitial lung disease is a quantitative scoring method of disease extent and severity. The grading involves the following features of the disease:

Feature Grading
Global disease extent Estimated to the nearest 5%
Extent of reticulation Proportion of total disease extent
Extent of ground-glass Proportion of total disease extent
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